Thursday, December 20, 2012

Should You Use Mouth Rinse?


Mouth rinse or mouthwash is a product used for oral hygiene. Antiseptic and anti-plaque mouth rinse claims to kill the germs that cause plaque, gingivitis, and bad breath. Anti-cavity mouth rinse uses fluoride to protect against tooth decay. Mouth rinses are generally classified either as cosmetic, therapeutic, or a combination of the two. Cosmetic rinses are commercial, over-the-counter (OTC) products that help remove oral debris before or after brushing, temporarily suppress bad breath, diminish bacteria in the mouth, and refresh the mouth with a pleasant taste. Therapeutic rinses have all of the benefits of cosmetic rinses but also contain an added active ingredient that helps protect against some oral diseases. Therapeutic rinses also can be categorized according to use: anti-plaque/anti-gingivitis rinses or anti-cavity fluoride rinses, for example.

Dentists will prescribe special rinses for patients with more severe oral problems, such as cavities, periodontal disease, gum inflammation, and xerostomia (dry mouth). Therapeutic rinses also are strongly recommended for those who can't brush due to physical impairments or medical reasons.

Should I use a mouth rinse?
Whether or not you should use a mouth rinse depends upon your needs. Many dentists consider the use of fluoride toothpaste alone to be more than adequate protection against cavities. Although anti-cavity rinses with fluoride have been clinically proven to fight up to 50 percent more of the bacteria that cause cavities, and most rinses are effective at curbing bad breath
and freshening the mouth for up to three hours, initial studies have shown that most OTC anti-plaque rinses and antiseptics are not much more effective against plaque and gum disease than rinsing with water.

Most dentists are skeptical about the value of these anti-plaque products, and studies point to only a 20 to 25 percent effectiveness, at best, in reducing the plaque that causes gingivitis. Mouth rinses can cause harm by masking the symptoms of an oral health disease or condition.

How should I use a mouth rinse?
Before using mouth rinses, dentists suggest that you brush and floss your teeth well. Then, measure the proper amount of rinse as specified on the container or as instructed by your dentist. With your lips closed and the teeth kept slightly apart, swish the liquid around with as much force as possible. Many rinses suggest swishing for 30 seconds or more. Finally, thoroughly spit the liquid from your mouth. Teeth should be as clean as possible before applying an anti-cavity rinse to reap the full preventive benefits. Consumers should not rinse, eat, or smoke for 30 minutes after using rinses, as these practices will dilute the fluoride and rinse it away.

Article Source: http://www.knowyourteeth.com/infobites/abc/article/?abc=M&iid=781&aid=3804


If you are looking for a dentist in the South Bay, please do no hesitate to contact
South Bay Dental Solutions. We are located in Manhattan Beach, CA and provide all general and cosmetic dental services.

South Bay Dental Solutions
1213 Manhattan Avenue  
Manhattan Beach, CA 90266
(310) 545-5910

Follow us on Twitter: @mbteeth 


Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Video Round-Up: Children's Edition

Need help teaching your kids about good oral health habits? Here are two videos to get you started. Early childhood is the prime time to teach your children about the best oral hygiene habits. 

Video Source: YouTube

If you are looking for a dentist in the South Bay, please do no hesitate to contact
South Bay Dental Solutions. We are located in Manhattan Beach, CA and provide all general and cosmetic dental services.

South Bay Dental Solutions
1213 Manhattan Avenue  
Manhattan Beach, CA 90266
(310) 545-5910

Follow us on Twitter: @mbteeth 


Wednesday, December 5, 2012

Headaches and Jaw Pain? It might be your posture


If you experience frequent headaches and pain in your lower jaw, check your posture and consult your dentist about temporomandibular disorder (TMD), recommends the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), an organization of general dentists dedicated to continuing dental education.

Poor posture places the spine in a position that causes stress to the jaw joint. When people slouch or hunch over, the lower jaw shifts forward, causing the upper and lower teeth to not fit together properly, and the skull moves back on the spinal column.

This movement puts stress on muscles, joints and bones and, if left untreated, can create pain and inflammation in muscles and joints when the mouth opens and closes.

"Good posture is important, yet many people don't realize how posture affects their oral health," says AGD spokesperson Ludwig Leibsohn, DDS.

Dr. Leibsohn treats patients who have complained of facial pain. "Their posture often is unbalanced, and this rearranges the position of the facial muscles, causing the bumps and grooves on the upper and lower teeth not to fit properly together," said Dr. Leibsohn.

An oral appliance can help align the teeth in a position that will reduce facial pain caused by poor posture. The appliance can also prevent future damage to teeth.



If you are looking for a dentist in the South Bay, please do no hesitate to contact
South Bay Dental Solutions. We are located in Manhattan Beach, CA and provide all general and cosmetic dental services.

South Bay Dental Solutions
1213 Manhattan Avenue  
Manhattan Beach, CA 90266
(310) 545-5910

Follow us on Twitter: @mbteeth 

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Important Oral Health Considerations For Women


Women can attribute bloating, irritability, moodiness, and the occasional hot flash or emotional outburst to hormones. But, according to an article in the May 2009 issue of AGD Impact, the Academy of General Dentistry's (AGD) monthly newsmagazine, the state of one's oral health is hormone-dependant as well.

Hormonal changes occur throughout a woman's life, and related to these hormonal changes are changes in oral health. Puberty, menstruation, pregnancy, and menopause all can have an effect on a woman's oral health.

During puberty, fluctuations in hormones can make gums more susceptible to gingivitis. As a result, the gums may appear red and swollen, and they can bleed. During menstruation, women who have a tendency to develop canker sores and cold sores may develop a pattern in which these sores recur during every menstrual cycle.

During pregnancy, gingivitis may develop. In fact, gingivitis is the most common oral condition associated with being pregnant. Also during pregnancy, the chemical composition of saliva changes, thus reducing saliva's antimicrobial capacity. Sometimes, however, women will avoid dental checkups for fear that treatment might harm the developing baby. In fact, untreated decayed teeth can put a mother and her baby at risk for infection.

Some women also experience dry mouth while pregnant. "Since too little saliva can make you prone to cavity formation, it's important to alert your dentist to this symptom," says AGD spokesperson Gigi Meinecke, DDS, FAGD. "Frequent sips of water and using toothpaste which does not contain sodium laurel sulfate, a drying agent, can help. It's important to avoid mouth rinses containing alcohol as they can be very drying as well," she adds.

Menopause can be accompanied by a number of oral conditions. "Symptoms can include dry mouth, altered taste perception, pain, and burning sensations, says Dr. Meinecke. "Patients with these symptoms should see their dentist to rule out any other cause for their condition as well as receive recommendations for treatment," she adds.

Together, a patient and his or her dentist can create a treatment and prevention plan that specifically meets their needs. For more information about women's oral health, visit www.knowyourteeth.com.

Types of eating disorders:  
  • Anorexia nervosa  
  • Bulimia nervosa  
  • Binge eating disorder  
  • Food addiction  
  • Pica


Article Source: http://www.knowyourteeth.com/infobites/abc/article/?abc=W&iid=341&aid=5512

If you are looking for a dentist in the South Bay, please do no hesitate to contact
South Bay Dental Solutions. We are located in Manhattan Beach, CA and provide all general and cosmetic dental services.

South Bay Dental Solutions
1213 Manhattan Avenue  
Manhattan Beach, CA 90266
(310) 545-5910

Follow us on Twitter: @mbteeth 


Tuesday, November 20, 2012

What Foods Cause Tooth Decay In Children?


Many different types of food can cause tooth decay in children, not just candy. Foods that are high in carbohydrates, as well as some fruits, juices and sodas, peanut butter, crackers and potato chips are culprits. Factors that cause tooth decay include the frequency in which the foods are eaten and the time they remain as particles in the mouth. 

Are children safe from soda and other beverages?

Dentists believe that kids who consume too much soda and not enough nutritional beverages are prone to tooth decay in addition to serious ailments later in life, such as diabetes and osteoporosis. Drinking carbonated soft drinks regularly can contribute to the erosion of tooth enamel.  Enamel breakdown leads to cavities. If erosion spreads beneath the enamel, pain and sensitivity may eventually result. This can cause nerve infection, which can result in the need for a root canal. 

My children rarely drink soda. Are they still at risk for tooth decay?

Yes. Any prolonged exposure to soda can cause damage. Sipping a soft drink all afternoon is more harmful to your teeth than drinking a large soda with a meal and then not drinking any soda for the rest of the day. While many dentists advocate drinking nutritional beverages, such as milk, many agree soda should be consumed from a can rather than a bottle with a replaceable cap to discourage prolonged exposure to soda.

How can children prevent damage to their teeth?

Children at school should rinse their mouth with water after meals, leaving their teeth free of sugar and acid. Children also should seek sources of fluoridation. If you purchase bottled water, be sure that it is fluoridated. Encourage children to drink tap or fountain water. Use a straw when drinking soda to keep sugar away from teeth. Remember, bottled juices are not a good alternative due to the high sugar content. Regular dental checkups, combined with brushing with fluoride toothpaste, also will help protect children's teeth.

How can I help my child prevent tooth decay?

Parents should take their child to the dentist just after the first tooth appears. Brushing teeth after meals, regular flossing and fluoride treatments are the best ways to prevent tooth decay. Children should also be supervised as they brush. A good rule of thumb is that when children can dress themselves and tie their own shoes, then they are ready to brush unsupervised. Children should be supervised in proper flossing techniques until the age of 10. If you have any concerns about your child's dental health or want some tips on preventing tooth decay, ask your dentist.

Article Source: http://www.knowyourteeth.com/infobites/abc/article/?abc=N&iid=316&aid=1282


If you are looking for a dentist in the South Bay, please do no hesitate to contact
South Bay Dental Solutions. We are located in Manhattan Beach, CA and provide all general and cosmetic dental services.

South Bay Dental Solutions
1213 Manhattan Avenue  
Manhattan Beach, CA 90266
(310) 545-5910

Follow us on Twitter: @mbteeth 


Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Men's Oral Health


Men are less likely than women to take care of their physical health and, according to surveys and studies, their oral health is equally ignored. Good oral health recently has been linked with longevity. Yet, one of the most common factors associated with infrequent dental checkups is just being male. Men are less likely than women to seek preventive dental care and often neglect their oral health for years, visiting a dentist only when a problem arises. When it comes to oral health, statistics show that the average man brushes his teeth 1.9 times a day and will lose 5.4 teeth by age 72. If he smokes, he can plan on losing 12 teeth by age 72. Men are also more likely to develop oral and throat cancer and periodontal (gum) disease.

Why is periodontal disease a problem? 

Periodontal disease is a result of plaque, which hardens into a rough, porous substance called tartar. The acids produced and released by bacteria found in tartar irritate gums. These acids cause the breakdown of fibers that anchor the gums tightly to the teeth, creating periodontal pockets that fill with even more bacteria. Researchers have found a connection between gum disease and cardiovascular disease, which can place people at risk for heart attacks and strokes. See your dentist if you have any of these symptoms:

  • Bleeding gums during brushing
  • Red, swollen or tender gums
  • Persistent bad breath
  • Loose or separating teeth
Do you take medications?

Since men are more likely to suffer from heart attacks, they also are more likely to be on medications that can cause dry mouth. If you take medication for the heart or blood pressure, or if you take antidepressants, your salivary flow could be inhibited, increasing the risk for cavities. Saliva helps to reduce the cavity-causing bacteria found in your mouth.

Do you use tobacco?

If you smoke or chew, you have a greater risk for gum disease and oral cancer. Men are affected twice as often as women, and 95 percent of oral cancers occur in those over 40 years of age.

The most frequent oral cancer sites are the tongue, the floor of the mouth, soft palate tissues in back of the tongue, lips and gums. If not diagnosed and treated in its early stages, oral cancer can spread, leading to chronic pain, loss of function, irreparable facial and oral disfigurement following surgery and even death. More than 8,000 people die each year from oral and pharyngeal diseases. If you use tobacco, it is important to see a dentist frequently for cleanings and to ensure your mouth remains healthy. Your general dentist can perform a thorough screening for oral cancer.

Do you play sports?

If you participate in sports, you have a greater potential for trauma to your mouth and teeth. If you play contact sports, such as football, soccer, basketball and even baseball, it is important to use a mouthguard, which is a flexible appliance made of plastic that protects teeth from trauma. If you ride bicycles or motorcycles, wear a helmet.

Taking care of your teeth 


To take better care of your oral health, it is important to floss daily, brush your teeth with fluoride toothpaste twice daily and visit your dentist at least twice a year for cleanings. Here are some tips to better dental health:

  • Use a soft-bristled toothbrush to reach every surface of each tooth. If the bristles on your toothbrush are bent or frayed, buy a new one.
  • Replace your toothbrush every three months or after you've been sick.
  • Choose a toothpaste with fluoride. This can reduce tooth decay by as much as 40 percent.
  • Brush properly. To clean the outside surfaces of your teeth, position the brush at a 45-degree angle where your gums and teeth meet. Gently move the brush in a circular motion using short, gentle strokes. To clean the inside surfaces of the upper and lower front teeth, hold the brush vertically. Make several gentle strokes over each tooth and its surrounding gum tissue. Spend at least three minutes brushing.
  • Floss properly. Gently insert floss between teeth using a back-and-forth motion. Do not force the floss or snap it into place. Curve the floss into a C-shape against one tooth and then the other.
Article Source: Here


If you are looking for a dentist in the South Bay, please do no hesitate to contact
South Bay Dental Solutions. We are located in Manhattan Beach, CA and provide all general and cosmetic dental services.

South Bay Dental Solutions
1213 Manhattan Avenue  
Manhattan Beach, CA 90266
(310) 545-5910

Follow us on Twitter: @mbteeth 




Tuesday, November 6, 2012

What To Do In A Dental Emergency


Toothache

Begin by cleaning around the sore tooth meticulously. Using warm salt water, rinse the mouth to displace any food trapped between teeth. UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES should you use aspirin directly on the aching tooth or gum.  In the event of facial swelling, apply a cold compress to the area and contact our office immediately. For temporary pain relief, ibuprofen is recommended.


Cut or Bitten Tongue, Lip or Cheek

Ice can be applied to any bruised areas. For bleeding, apply firm (but gentle) pressure with sterile gauze or a clean cloth. If the bleeding does not stop with pressure or continues after 15 minutes, go to an emergency room. Sometimes a wrung out teabag can be used as a compress, the caffeine in the tea helps control the bleeding.

Broken Tooth


Rinse the area with warm water, typically cold temperatures will annoy a fractured tooth. Recover any broken tooth fragments. Get immediate dental attention.


Knocked Out Permanent Tooth


Recover the tooth and make sure to hold it by the crown only, not the root end. Rinse with saline or milk, but do not clean or handle the tooth more than necessary. Reinsert the tooth into the socket and hold it in place using a clean piece of gauze or cloth until you get to the dental office. If the tooth cannot be reinserted, carry it in a cup containing milk or water. Because time is critical, see a dentist immediately.


Cold or Canker Sores


Over-the-counter medications will usually provide temporary relief. If sores persist, warm salt water rinses can be helpful.




If you are looking for a dentist in the South Bay, please do no hesitate to contact
South Bay Dental Solutions. We are located in Manhattan Beach, CA and provide all general and cosmetic dental services.

South Bay Dental Solutions
1213 Manhattan Avenue  
Manhattan Beach, CA 90266
(310) 545-5910

Follow us on Twitter: @mbteeth 


Tuesday, October 30, 2012

What Is Dry Mouth?


What do I Need to Know About Dry Mouth?

Everyone has a dry mouth once in a while — if they are nervous, upset or under stress.
But if you have a dry mouth all or most of the time, it can be uncomfortable and can lead to serious health problems.
Dry mouth ...
  • Can cause difficulties in tasting, chewing, swallowing, and speaking
  • Can increase your chance of developing dental decay and other infections in the mouth
  • Can be a sign of certain diseases and conditions
  • Can be caused by certain medications or medical treatments
Dry mouth is not a normal part of aging. So if you think you have dry mouth, see your dentist or physician — there are things you can do to get relief.

What is Dry Mouth?

Dry mouth is the condition of not having enough saliva, or spit, to keep your mouth wet.
Symptoms Include:
  • A sticky, dry feeling in the mouth
  • Trouble chewing, swallowing, tasting or speaking
  • A burning feeling in the mouth
  • A dry feeling in the throat
  • Cracked lips
  • A dry, tough tongue
  • Mouth sores
  • An infection in the mouth
Why is Saliva so Important?
  • Saliva does more than keep the mouth wet. It helps digest food
  • It protects teeth from decay
  • It prevents infection by controlling bacteria and fungi in the mouth
  • It makes it possible for you to chew and swallow
Without enough saliva you can develop tooth decay or other infections in the mouth. You also might not get the nutrients you need if you cannot chew and swallow certain foods.

What causes Dry Mouth?

People get dry mouth when the glands in the mouth that make saliva are not working properly. Because of this, there might not be enough saliva to keep your mouth wet. There are several reasons why these glands (called salivary glands) might not work right.
  • Side effects of some medicines — more than 400 medicines can cause the salivary glands to make less saliva. Medicines for high blood pressure and depression often cause dry mouth
  • Disease — some diseases affect the salivary glands. Sj√∂gren's Syndrome, HIV/AIDS, diabetes, and Parkinson's disease can all cause dry mouth
  • Radiation therapy — the salivary glands can be damaged if they are exposed to radiation during cancer treatment
  • Chemotherapy — drugs used to treat cancer can make saliva thicker, causing the mouth to feel dry.
  • Nerve damage — injury to the head or neck can damage the nerves that tell salivary glands to make saliva.

What Can be Done About Dry Mouth?

Dry mouth treatment will depend on what is causing the problem. If you think you have dry mouth, see your dentist or physician. He or she can try to determine what is causing your dry mouth.
  • If your dry mouth is caused by medicine, your physician might change your medicine or adjust the dosage
  • If your salivary glands are not working right but can still produce some saliva, your physician or dentist might give you a medicine that helps the glands work better
  • Your physician or dentist might suggest that you use artificial saliva to keep your mouth wet
What can I do?
  • Sip water or sugarless drinks often
  • Avoid drinks with caffeine, such as coffee, tea, and some sodas. Caffeine can dry out the mouth
  • Sip water or a sugarless drink during meals. This will make chewing and swallowing easier. It may also improve the taste of food
  • Chew sugarless gum or suck on sugarless hard candy to stimulate saliva flow; citrus, cinnamon or mint-flavored candies are good choices
  • Don't use tobacco or alcohol. They dry out the mouth
  • Be aware that spicy or salty foods may cause pain in a dry mouth
  • Use a humidifier at night
Tips for Keeping Your Teeth Healthy
Remember, if you have dry mouth, you need to be extra careful to keep your teeth healthy. Make sure you:
  • Gently brush your teeth at least twice a day
  • Floss your teeth every day
  • Use toothpaste with fluoride in it. Most toothpastes sold at grocery and drug stores have fluoride in them
  • Avoid sticky, sugary foods. If you do eat them, brush immediately afterwards
  • Visit your dentist for a check-up at least twice a year. Your dentist might give you a special fluoride solution that you can rinse with to help keep your teeth healthy
Article Source: Colgate


If you are looking for a dentist in the South Bay, please do no hesitate to contact
South Bay Dental Solutions. We are located in Manhattan Beach, CA and provide all general and cosmetic dental services.

South Bay Dental Solutions
1213 Manhattan Avenue  
Manhattan Beach, CA 90266
(310) 545-5910

Follow us on Twitter: @mbteeth 

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Should You Have Your Wisdom Teeth Removed?


Jennifer Flach was a college junior when her wisdom teeth started making themselves known.
"My other teeth started moving around," she remembers. "The wisdom teeth were pushing out and undoing some of the orthodontic work I had done in high school."
At the same time, her brother — who's two years younger and was also in college — had no symptoms. But the family dentist suggested his wisdom teeth should come out too.
Jen and her brother had back-to-back wisdom tooth extractions and recovered together at home during spring break. "It was quite a week at my parents' house," she says.
Patrick Grother was 26 when his dentist mentioned that his wisdom teeth might need to be removed. His bottom left wisdom tooth had partially erupted into his mouth and a flap of gum still covered it. "The dentist said food would get trapped there and it could get infected," he says. Patrick then visited a periodontist, who said that the gum flap could be cut away but it would grow back.
"I put it off for awhile," Patrick said, but he eventually had the wisdom teeth on the left side of his mouth extracted.
A few people are born without wisdom teeth or have room in their mouths for them, but like Jen and her brother, many of us get our wisdom teeth taken out during our college years. And like Patrick, many of us are first alerted to the problem when our wisdom teeth don't emerge (erupt) into the mouth properly because there is not enough toom for them to fit.
"A part of the tooth may remain covered by a flap of gum, where food particles and bacteria can get trapped, causing a mild irritation, a low-grade infection called pericoronitis and swelling," says Dr. Donald Sadowsky, professor emeritus of clinical dentistry College of Dental Medicine and the Mailman School of Public Health. This usually happens with the lower wisdom teeth. Pericoronitis and the pain it causes is the most common reason people need their wisdom teeth taken out.
Pericoronitis is just one of the reasons that you may need to have a wisdom tooth or more than one removed.
In many people, the wisdom teeth never even partially enter the mouth. Often the teeth are tilted under the gum and blocked from coming in by bone or other teeth. Dentists call these impacted teeth; they may cause pain, but you may feel nothing at all for years. You may not even be aware that you have wisdom teeth until your dentist sees them on an X-ray.
Regular dental visits are important during your teens and early twenties because this is the time when teeth are most likely to decay. Regular visits allow your dentist to follow the progress of your wisdom teeth with X-rays.
Even if your wisdom teeth aren't causing any pain or other problems, they may cause problems at some point. The most common problems are decay, infection, and crowding or damage to other teeth. But more serious complications can occur, including the development of a cyst that can cause permanent damage to bone, teeth and nerves.
However, not all wisdom teeth need to be removed.
If removing wisdom teeth is necessary, it's easier in younger people because the tooth roots are not fully developed and the bone in which the teeth sit is less dense. Extracting your wisdom teeth before any complications develop also allows for shorter recovery time and less discomfort after the surgery.
Article Source: Colgate

If you are looking for a dentist in the South Bay, please do no hesitate to contact
South Bay Dental Solutions. We are located in Manhattan Beach, CA and provide all general and cosmetic dental services.

South Bay Dental Solutions
1213 Manhattan Avenue  
Manhattan Beach, CA 90266
(310) 545-5910

Follow us on Twitter: @mbteeth 

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Cracked Tooth Syndrome



What Is It?
Unlike teeth with obvious fractures, teeth with cracked tooth syndrome usually have fractures that are too small to be seen on X-rays. Sometimes the fracture is below the gum line, making it even more difficult to identify.
Cracked tooth syndrome more often occurs in molars, usually lower molars, which absorb most of the forces of chewing.
People who grind or clench their teeth may be more susceptible to cracked tooth syndrome because of the constant forces put on their teeth. Sometimes a person's normal bite causes certain molar cusps (the highest points of the tooth) to exert so much pressure on the opposing tooth that it cracks.
Teeth with large fillings or teeth that have undergone root canal treatment are weaker than other teeth and may be more likely to crack. People with one cracked tooth are more likely to have others, either at the same time or in the future.

Symptoms

You may experience pain in the tooth when you bite or chew. However, it probably will not happen all the time. The tooth may be painful only when you eat certain foods or when you bite in a specific way. You will not feel a constant ache, as you would if you had a cavity or abscess, but the tooth may be more sensitive to cold temperatures. If the crack worsens, the tooth may become loose.
Many people with cracked tooth syndrome have symptoms for months, but it's often difficult to diagnose because the symptoms are not consistent.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cracked tooth syndrome is often difficult. Your dentist will do a thorough examination of your mouth and teeth, focusing on the tooth in question. He or she may use a sharp instrument called an explorer to feel for cracks in the tooth and will inspect the gums around the tooth for irregularities. Your dentist also may take X-rays, although X-rays often do not show the crack.
Your dentist may use a special instrument to test the tooth for fractures. One instrument looks like a toothbrush without bristles that fits over one part of the tooth at a time as you bite down. If you feel pain, the cusp being tested most likely has a crack affecting it.
Your dentist may shine a fiber-optic light on the tooth or stain it with a special dye to search for a crack. If the tooth already has a filling or crown, your dentist may remove it so he or she can better inspect the tooth.

Expected Duration

How long symptoms last depends somewhat on how quickly a cracked tooth can be diagnosed. Even then, treatment may not always completely relieve the symptoms.

Prevention

If you grind or clench your teeth, talk to your dentist about treatment. Grinding can increase your risk of cracked tooth syndrome.

Treatment

Treatments for cracked tooth syndrome do not always completely relieve the symptoms.
Treatment depends on the location, direction and extent of the crack. Cracks vary from superficial ones in the outer layers of the tooth to deep splits in the root affecting the pulp (the center of the tooth, which contains the tooth's nerves).
If the crack affects one or more cusps of a tooth, the tooth may be restored with a crown. If a crack affects the pulp, you probably will need root canal treatment. About 20% of teeth with cracked tooth syndrome require root canals. After a root canal, the tooth will no longer be sensitive to temperature, but it still will respond to pressure. This means that if you felt pain when you bit down before the root canal, you probably will not feel it as intensely as before, but you may feel it from time to time.
In some severe cases, the tooth may need to be extracted. Some cracks extend into the root of the tooth under the bone and there's no way to fix the tooth. If your dentist decides the tooth needs to be extracted, you can have it replaced with an implant or a bridge.

When To Call a Professional

If you experience pain upon biting or chewing, contact your dental office.

Prognosis

Treatment of cracked tooth syndrome is not always successful. Your dentist should inform you about the prognosis. In some people, a restoration with a crown will relieve all symptoms. In others, root canal treatment solves the problem. Some people continue to have occasional symptoms after treatment, and may need to have the tooth extracted.
Article Source: Colgate


If you are looking for a dentist in the South Bay, please do no hesitate to contact
South Bay Dental Solutions. We are located in Manhattan Beach, CA and provide all general and cosmetic dental services.

South Bay Dental Solutions
1213 Manhattan Avenue  
Manhattan Beach, CA 90266
(310) 545-5910

Follow us on Twitter: @mbteeth